Category Archives: Tactical Kit

Chest rigs, war-belts, mag pouches. All the shooty stuff you might wear on you.

Colt Canada IUR Video Review

Correction! The C9 LMG is made by FN, not Colt Canada. Derp.

Colt Canada, formerly Diemaco, has made a limited number of their monolithic uppers available to Canadian civilian shooters. I picked up one of their “blemished” units back in October and have had a great time shooting it.

These upper receivers that came to the civilian market were overrun from a military contract, possibly with the Danish Army. They were sold without charging handles or bolt carrier groups, but did feature a 15.7″ cold hammer forged barrel and a C9 flash-hider.

The IUR is part of the C7/C8 upgrade program and offers a free floated barrel and rock solid handguard for mounting accessories and optics. We did see a new M-LOK version called the MRR at Shot Show 2016. Complete versions of the Modular Railed Rifle are expected to be available to Canadian civilian shooters this summer.

Night Vision Phase One

Here’s the first wave! This central video will grow as each feature piece is added on. I’ve been working with night vision for years. Looking at different systems and solutions for different people and budgets. This series is going to lay out some of that in as simple a way as possible. There’s lots of details and specific scenarios when it comes to working in the dark, but my goal is to give you the basic understanding and present some comparisons. From there we can start to tackle the fun-stuff.

Stay tuned! Each companion piece will take us into deeper detail on it’s system and topic. And if you have any specific questions about NV gear and the dark, let me know!

Preview: An Examination of Night Vision Systems…

Coming soon! It’s no secret that in the past I’ve worked for companies that sold night vision. Now that I’m freelance and have free reign, I’ve been putting together a large scope project for several months. Now we’re quite close to seeing it come together, so this is your sneak peek.

Essentially, I’m looking to clarify NVGs and compare what you get for your money with different technologies. So I will be examining both image intensified and thermal night vision units, looking at a budget and mil-spec example of each. Expect lots of photos, videos, and a few words from me.

I’ll also talk about some beginner mistakes made with different forms of night vision, and examine scenario specific equipment. Getting the right gear for working in the dark is all about the kind of work you’re doing.

I’ve seen a few low light courses and instructors run very successful programs, but completely ignore the opti-electronic devices that are increasingly available. There’s nothing wrong with white light, but there’s a whole other world happening once you enter the IR spectrum. Stay tuned…

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Colt Canada’s Next Gen Prototype is a Grenade Launching Bullpup

This rifle is part of the Canadian Future Small Arms Research (FSAR) project.

Developed with the Canadian Forces through the Soldier Integrated Precision Effects Systems (SIPES) project.

A bullpup design that features the ability to install either a three round 40 mm grenade launcher, or a 12-gauge shotgun.

The next phase will feature a TrackingPoint style system to automatically detect targets and assist in engaging them.

You can see them test fire several types of munitions below. Watch for the 5.56 ejection!

There’s some obvious similarities between this system and the US’s early OICW program. Although the article describes this prototype as being lighter than a conventional C7 & M203 combo.

You can read the full text at Defence Research and Development Canada

Tasmanian Tiger Trojan Rifle Carrier Pack

Introduction to the Tasmanian Tiger Trojan Rifle Carrier Pack

Rifle packs are a great way to carry a gun, especially if you’re climbing up trails and over hills.

I’ve been using various carriers for years, but at the start of 2014 I received a new and unique system: the Tasmanian Tiger Trojan.

The Trojan has a lot to offer as a rifle carrier, and after a few months of using it I can see myself retiring some of my older packs.

Continue reading Introduction to the Tasmanian Tiger Trojan Rifle Carrier Pack

Practical Not Tactical: War-Belts Outside of War

This post is looking at two different load-bearing setups I’ve experimented with over the course of a year, using the same kit in two very different applications.

At the core of this is the war-belt, also known as a battle-belt. This padded belt traditionally integrated into a soldier’s load bearing system. It carries rifle magazines, first aid kits, and all manner of necessary equipment when on patrol overseas or in any number of dangerous environments. However, the war-belt has found a life independent from the drop-loads, chest-rigs, plate-carriers, and assault-packs involved in a complete system.

I have two distinct setups built from Tasmanian Tiger’s Warrior Belt: one for the specific applications of 3-Gun, and one built to maximize flexibility outdoors between all kinds of firearms.
Continue reading Practical Not Tactical: War-Belts Outside of War

Tavor CTAR21 Bullpup Rifle

Slings for Bullpups: Revisiting the Tavor

It’s been more than a year since my last post on slings for the Tavor, and I feel a good deal smarter now than I did then.

As part of the CTAR-21 build I decided to change to a simpler, more flexible sling system.

Essentially, it is a quiet, easily adjustable 2 point sling that still allows for off-shoulder firing. Continue reading Slings for Bullpups: Revisiting the Tavor