Tatonka Lastenkraxe Pack River-side Video Review

Tatonka’s Lastenkraxe is one of the most robust and well built frame packs currently on the market. I’ve taken my Lastenkraxe pack on several trips, both for short hikes and multi-day trips. This is the video review I put together on my last trip out:

The Lastenkraxe is substantially more robust than some of the other frame packs I’ve handled, using a fixed step at the base of the pack. There are many mounting points to attach either the Tatonka pack, or any oddly shaped or oversized gear that necessitates the frame system.

I found the carry system to be really solid on this pack. As a lightly built person I will always choose a more adjustable pack over one that “fits most.” Tatonka uses the V2 system, which fits similarly to an eberlestock, but without the weight those packs are notorious for.

Tatonka V2 Carrying system on the Lastenkraxe

One of the major advantages of the Lastenkraxe that I go through in the video is the ability to stand the pack upright on its frame. Unlike many packs that lie flat or slump, the Lastenkraxe can be firmly planted and won’t topple over. I find this especially useful in the camp when I am often looking for something like a bin I can take things in and out of. I like to keep a tidy site, and gear spread all over is gear that could easily get left behind, so the lastenkraxe offers an almost laundry bin like ability to keep things easily organized.

Rather than having to unzip and delve into pockets, the Lastenkraxe has a simple fold down top that covers the pack, but keeps it easy to get into and out.

If there is a short-coming of this pack, its that same lack of organizational pockets. There is one large bucket, and then three midsized flaps on the outside of the pack. But those exterior pockets don’t fasten shut, and there’s very little organization for smaller things.

Personally I use those external pockets to carry long items like axes or tripods that are good to have accessible and would be awkward to store inside, but I can see why some people might want more options when it comes to small compartments.

The Lastenkraxe will definitely stay on as my go-to heavy pack for years to come.

TAR-21 Sling Configurations: IWI Factory Sling, Urban E.R.T. and Single Point Slings

The newest version of this article is about updated slings on my CTAR-21 Tavor SBR.

This video is exclusively about slings on the TAR-21 and other bull-pups. Because the Tavor is non-restricted, I like to take it places beyond the case-car-range travel plan that handguns and ARs are largely stuck with. I examine three different options for retaining a Tavor on your body . . .  Continue reading TAR-21 Sling Configurations: IWI Factory Sling, Urban E.R.T. and Single Point Slings

Tavor TAR-21 and Magpul P-Mag compatibility

Now there’s some discussion over whether this is a real phenomenon or not. From what I could see, on my rifle, it seems quite likely that the rear profile of the polymer magpul p-mag is touching the bolt hold open device just enough to raise it and have it interact with the bolt even when the magazine has rounds in it.

I believe this to be the source of the jams and failure to feeds I experienced previously.

Knight’s Armament SR-25 Versus H&K MR308 (HK417 in US)

I had a chance to talk with Brian at the Calgary Shooting Center about his restricted .308 rifles, the MR .308 and the Knight’s SR-25. We only talk about the MR .308, but they are both gorgeous guns to shoot.

These are still very much available in Canada. Keep in mind that we never touch 416 or 417 parts though. Just the MR223 and MR308s. The 416/417 are totally different platforms. (Well subtly different. But different enough that they are incompatible) which is why the MR308 is restricted and not prohibited. FN’s SCAR on the other hand: the civilian version can take military parts, and as a result it was listed as prohibited when the RCMP classified it.
Yes, the MR308 is restricted as an AR-15 variant.

Tasmanian Tiger MKII Chest Rig in Multicam

In under 2 minutes I review the Tasmanian Tiger Chest Rig, one of the german designed setups that definitely overshadows some of the other brands I’ve used.

I still own a tactical tailor rig, but it stays in the closet. The price, quality, and thought behind the Tasmanian Tiger unit is enough to make me go back to them with more money for more kit.

I say it in the video, but as the only rig which lets me wear a pack, the TT setup is the most comfortable of any chest rig I’ve tried.

HAMR and Delta Point Review: Leupold’s competitor to the ACOG

This is a combined video of my review of the Leupold HAMR and the run and gun exercises I’ve done with it. Its a 4X32 scope and red-dot combo. The full (long) cut of the run and gun is right after the jump . . .

Continue reading HAMR and Delta Point Review: Leupold’s competitor to the ACOG

Tavor TAR-21 Failure to Feed and Jams

Well it seems like I’ve finally done something wrong to this gun. She’s failing with disturbing regularity. Sometimes the round doesn’t make it into the chamber, and instead get bit by the bolt. Sometimes the bolt cycles and doesn’t grab anything. Sometimes the bolt-hold open device fails to engage.

After some substantial troubleshooting, I determined damage had happened to my bolt and bolt hold open device, possibly due to resting on a magazine, but also potentially from the magpul p-mags that I’ve been using. You can see the way they interact . . .

Continue reading Tavor TAR-21 Failure to Feed and Jams

Night Vision on the TAR-21

 

This combination took me a while to set up. Installing the full length top rail was a huge pain in the ass but it allowed me to mount a 512 eo-tech and riser in front of my ATN Spirit. With a Gen 2+ tube its not the best NVD available, but its certainly a cut above entry level units. Using a 1x lens and picatinny mount in conjunction with the IR output of the Inforce WML means I can confidently engage targets within 100 yards.

While current generation Tavors come with a full length rail, I had to buy mine from Canada Ammo. Made by Ranch Tactical, this rail is certainly a cut above the NEA equivalent, but it does have some fitting issues still. The rail fits over the lower profile gas block, effectively removing the rear flip up sight and covering the IWI proprietary NVD or magnifier mount.

The night vision I’m using now came from this site here:

Vortex Optics VOTRS kit

 

 

I spend some hands on time with the VOTRS kit, and try a few variations outside what ships in the box. Designed for long term viewing, the VOTRS kit combines both mid and high power optics in one system. It’s worth noting that I did not order a kit directly out of the catalog. I built mine over the course of a year picking up one part at a time. As a result my combination is different from those sold directly from Vortex.

Razor 85mm spotting scope, Razor 10×42 binoculars, Recon 10×50 RT monocular, CBX tripod

 

I assembled this over 2 years, mostly of stuff bought from Wholesale Sports. The case itself I had to special order from vortex. They no longer sell VOTRS kits as a retail item, but they will still custom build them for anyone who asks.